Bobet, Leah. (Toronto. ON)

Fiction, Poetry, and Non-Fiction. OLA Best Bets selection. Winner of the Prix Aurora Award, Sunburst Award, Utopia Award, Copper Cylinder Award, and Lydia Langstaff Prize; shortlisted for the Andre Norton Award for Young Adult Science Fiction and Fantasy, Cybils Award, and Canadian Library Association Young Adult Book Award.

$350 for one hour-long session, $600 for two, $850 for three, and $1000 for four, plus transit costs to public transit-accessible schools, or where transport from the nearest transit stop/station is available. For virtual visits: $275 for one session, 60-90 minutes, $175 for each additional session on the same day. Leah is happy to discuss alternate rates with high-needs or under-resourced schools.

Fantasy novelist, bookseller, critic, and editor Leah Bobet knows the half the joy of reading is getting curious about something new. She gives inclusive, information-rich presentations that make sure to keep things fun—and emphasize the talents participants already have. She specializes in fantasy and science fiction, climate fiction, and poetry, and strongly believes in a supportive, positive presentation style that emphasizes tools over rules. The goal: to make sure students leave feeling confident, curious, and inspired.

Leah works with groups from Grade 7 and up (adults included!) and has given presentations and workshops at Toronto Public Library, Oakville Public Library, London Book Camp, Word on the Street, the Tucson Festival of Books, and universities across North America. Presentations are tailored to fit your group’s interests and current classroom topics, and can be custom-designed for your group with appropriate lead time.

Recent presentation topics include:

Writing Urban Fantasy: Finding Magic in Your Neighbourhood

A workshop-style presentation for fantasy readers, geography classes, or Writer’s Craft groups, this presentation introduces students to the core concepts of writing urban fantasy and finding places in one’s everyday world where magic can fit. Includes a 30-minute writing and sharing activity, and focuses on the basic skill of reading and writing fantasy: seeing wonder in our everyday surroundings.

Where It Comes From: Worldbuilding, the Apocalypse, and All Our Stuff

Using Leah’s 2015 YA novel An Inheritance of Ashes as a basis, this presentation talks about the everyday things we use—sugar, plastic, soap—and how many people’s work goes into building our average day.  Through showing how Ashes builds a post-apocalyptic world without industrialization, the group discusses repurposing, reusing, sharing economies, and how making it yourself can be a lot of fun.

This presentation is great for classes focusing on sustainability, materials science, or environmental studies.

Above and Toronto’s Secret Spaces

Using Leah’s 2012 novel Above as a jumping-off point, this presentation digs into Toronto’s (very real!) underground sewers, tunnels, and abandoned places to explore the cooler side of local history, and how our neighbourhoods are made of not just buildings but experiences.

This semi-interactive presentation touches on fantasy-novel worldbuilding, but prompts students to explore how people move through the same spaces in different ways, consider whose stories we tell

—and think about how we design space for the society we want.

This presentation is a great fit for classes focusing on Canadian history, social studies, or geography.

Poetry is music

Poetry can be intimidating—or not! This presentation draws on pop songs, contemporary poetry, and music theory to show participants how to think of poetry as a house made of sound. The goal: to take down obstacles between poetry and readers.

This presentation is a great fit for English or music classes, or as an extracurricular for school choir groups.

Equipment: Leah is happy to work with groups of up to 75, though workshops will run best when capped at 20 participants. Screen and projector appreciated for Powerpoint presentations; clear sound equipment for poetry presentations. If the room is larger or has difficult acoustics, a microphone is appreciated, as is a bottle of water. For multi-presentation days, a strictly gluten-free lunch or snacks (celiac-safe) are greatly appreciated.

Contact Leah to book a visit:

    Miskonoodinkwe Smith, Christine (Toronto, ON)

    Miskonoodinkwe Smith, Christine

    Indigenous Editor’s Association, longlisted for the First Nations Community Reads Program, ANDPVA National Signature Online Event 2022.

    Presentation Rates: 250.00 for one session, $450.00 for two, $675.00 for three, $1,000 for full day. Travel fee $.50/km if outside of Toronto. I don’t drive and would require funding for train or bus, plus Uber if available.

    Virtual Visit Fees range from $200-$250

    Christine Miskonoodinkwe-Smith- is a Saulteaux woman from Peguis First Nation and the author of “These Are the Stories: Memories of a 60s Scoop Survivor”. She is an author, editor, writer, and journalist who graduated from the University of Toronto with a specialization in Aboriginal Studies in June 2011 and went on to receive her Master’s in Education in Social Justice in June 2017. Her first non-fiction story “Choosing the Path to Healing” appeared in the 2006 anthology Growing Up Girl: An Anthology of Voices from Marginalized Spaces. She has written for the Native Canadian, Anishinabek News, Windspeaker, FNH Magazine, New Tribe Magazine, Muskrat Magazine and the Piker Press. She has also co-edited the anthology Bawaajigan with fellow Indigenous writer Nathan Niigan Noodin Adler.

    these-are-the-stories-Miskonoodinkwe-Smith-Christine.jpg

    Readings, Talks on Healing, Writing

    Preferred Venues- small spaces, libraries, café’s etc

    Preferred Audience Size-10-25 people, more if comfortable

    Tech requirements- microphone, sound system

    Contact Chrissy Miskonoodinkwe Smith:

      Tondreau-Levert, Louise (Grenville-sur-la-Rouge, Québec)

      Louise Tondreau-Levert

      Writers’ Union Member (UNEQ). AAOF (Association des auteurs de l’Ontario Francophone). CCBC (Canadian Children’s Books Center). Fiction, short stories, picture books and illustrated biography of Louis Riel.  

      Louise is a member of the “Union des écrivains” (UNEQ).

      Novels and first reading books, picture books and an illustrated biography of Louis Riel.

      In-Person Visits:  From 4 to 14 years $250 for 1 session, $400 for 2, $575 for 3 and 700$ for 4, + travel (50 cents per kilometer, round-trip from GSLR near Hawkesbury. [6 km] Lodging and meals if necessary are at the expense of the host organization.

      Virtual Visits: $250, for one session, 20–60 minutes, $100 for each additional session on the same day.

      A native of Montreal Louise Tondreau-Levert holds a certificate in childhood and youth literature from UQAM. For 10 years, she prepared and hosted “Storytime” at her local library. In October 1994, her text “Le grand lit de la petite Mimi” received the first prize in the literary competition of the magazine Lurelu. In November 1996 “Le lit à grimaces” was published by “Les 400 coups” and in 1997 it was among the finalists for  the Mr. Christie prize. Since then, Louise has published several short stories as well as many books such as those of the series “Virevent le petit fantôme” for the editor “Le soleil de minuit”, as well as the series “Les bêtises” and “Drôle de boulot” at “Dominique et compagnie”

      Workshops
      Louise is a flexible presenter. No two groups are ever the same and no two of her presentations are ever the same. She much prefers to interact with her audience than to give a dry presentation.

      From the 2nd grade,to improve interest in the activity reading of one or two of the author’s texts is suggested before her visit.

      For students from 10 to 14 years old the author suggests learning a bit of history with the novel “Le roman-vérité Louis Riel.” Others suggestions:  Sharing the daily life of children in Western Canada when Louis Riel was a child and during his adolescence when he attended Montreal College, taking a look at the history of Western Canada from the buffalo hunt to the founding of the province of Manitoba.

      For an overview of the Algonquin language check out Louise’s book, “Le secret de la lanterne”  written in French and in Algonquin.

      From 7 to 9 years old, the author reads one or two of the books in the series “Virevent le petit fantôme.” ( 5 books). She explains how the small ghost gets to meet children even if his mother does not agree. A documentary follows every short story. The subjects of the documentaries are bats, castles, storms, manatees, pigeons and peregrine falcons.

      From 4 to 7 years old, the animation takes the form of storytelling with among others, the albums, “Museau et l’œuf,” “Les monstres du prince Louis,” and “Le lit à grimaces.”

      6 to 10 years old, Une délicieuse compétition

       The author gives the definition of the word “competition” and then lists a few synonyms. After reading the book, “une délicieuse compétition,” which is projected on the class screen, Louise asks: should we pronounce, bretzels or pretzels? Where does this bread come from? Are there any cake names in this album that seem strange to you? Do these names have any other meaning? Then, she offers a friendly match between schoolmates. The team that can remember the more names of breads and cakes mentioned in the story wins!

      All the  author’s books are projected on the «Interactive Board». She brings her computer and all necessary connections. One class at a time or a maximum of 35 participants. 

      Contact Louise to book a visit…

        Camlot, Heather (Toronto, ON)

        Writers’ Union Member. Fiction and nonfiction writer. Heather’s rates are $250 for one session, $450 for two, $650 for three, $800 for four/full day (may be shared with a neighbouring school). $150 for a virtual visit. HST applies. No travel costs within Toronto. Able to present in English and French.

        Heather is an award-winning children’s author, journalist, editor and translator. Her two middle-grade novels, CLUTCH and THE OTHER SIDE, received Skipping Stones Honor Awards and nominations for Forest of Reading, among other honors. CLUTCH was also named a 2017 Best Book from Kirkus Reviews.

        Heather is also an accomplished nonfiction writer. The critically acclaimed middle-grade WHAT IF SOLDIERS FOUGHT WITH PILLOWS? TRUE STORIES OF IMAGINATION AND DETERMINATION (available in French as Et si les soldats se battaient avec des oreillers ?) was published in 2020 and three more books will be available in 2022:

        • I CAN’T DO WHAT? STRANGE LAWS AND RULES FROM AROUND THE WORLD
        • SECRET SCHOOLS: TRUE STORIES OF THE DETERMINATION TO LEARN
        • THE PRISONER AND THE WRITER, the story of wrongly imprisoned Captain Alfred Dreyfus and author Emile Zola’s fight to have him set free.

        In her presentations, Heather aims to entertain and educate, leaving the audience interested in writing fiction and nonfiction as well as looking into their own history for inspiration.

        Continue reading “Camlot, Heather (Toronto, ON)”

        McKay, Sharon (Burlington ON)

        Writers’ Union Member. Sharon travels across Canada several times a year. Sharon E. McKay (Mick-EYE) writes fact-based fiction for young adults. Multi-awards, all ages.

        Flat fee of $900 for a full day, four sessions and includes a free (optional) brown-bag lunch for anyone interested in writing. Flat fee of $600 for an afternoon. Parents and media are welcome in all sessions.

        Virtual Visits: $150, 60 minutes, Skype. Continue reading “McKay, Sharon (Burlington ON)”